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    Super Easy, Super Moist Chocolate Cupcakes

    Cupcakes:
    1 Preheat oven and prep muffin tin: Preheat oven to 350°F with a rack in the middle position. Prepare a muffin tin with cupcake liners.
    2 Whisk dry ingredients: In a large bowl, vigorously whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking soda, and salt until there are no visible clumps (cocoa tends to clump up).
    3 Mix wet ingredients: In a separate bowl, mix together the coffee (or water plus coffee granules), vinegar, vanilla extract, and olive oil.
    4 Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir only until they just come together. Do not over-beat! The mixture should be thin and rather lumpy.
    5 Ladle the batter into the cupcake liners, filling them about two-thirds of the way full.
    6 Bake: Place in oven and bake at 350°F for 18 to 20 minutes, until a bamboo skewer inserted in the center comes out clean.
    7 Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then remove from pan and let cool on a rack. Once cool, you can eat plain, sprinkle with powdered sugar, or drizzle or coat with frosting.
    Frosting:
    While the cupcakes are cooking, make the frosting. Melt butter in a small saucepan and remove from heat. Stir in the cocoa until smooth. Sprinkle in about a third of the powdered sugar, stir, then sprinkle in about a half of the milk. Keep alternating with the powdered sugar and either milk or vanilla, stirring after each addition, until the frosting is the consistency you want, and smooth. If it’s too runny, add more powdered sugar. If too stiff, add a little more milk or vanilla extract.
    To pipe in a decorative pattern, scoop the frosting into the corner of a ziplock freezer bag. Use scissors to cut away 1/4-inch or so from the tip of the corner. Then just squeeze the frosting out of the bag onto the cupcakes in any design you like. LEGGI TUTTO

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    Braised Beef Short Ribs

    1 Brown the ribs: Preheat oven to 350°F. Season ribs to taste with the salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large, heavy bottomed ovenproof pan over high heat. Add ribs and brown on all sides. Work in batches if you need to so that the ribs don’t get crowded (this will help with browning).
    2 Sauté vegetables: Transfer ribs to a plate. Pour off the excess fat (do not put down the drain or you will clog your sink!). Add the onions, celery, and carrots to the pan and sauté, stirring often, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the pan, set aside.
    3 Deglaze pan with wine, then reduce sauce: Add the wine to the pan, deglazing the pan, scraping off any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Reduce the wine by three-quarters until thick and slightly syrupy, about 15 minutes on high heat.
    4 Braise ribs in oven: Return the ribs to the pan, add the veal stock and enough water to cover the ribs. Bring to a boil, cover with foil, and place in the oven. Braise, cooking in the oven, until the meat is fork-tender, 2 to 2 1/2 hours.
    During the last 1/2 hour of cooking, add back in the vegetables.
    5 Chill overnight: Allow the ribs to cool in the liquid, then cover and refrigerate overnight.
    6 Remove excess fat: The next day, remove the excess fat that has solidified at the top from the overnight chilling.
    7 Reduce sauce with ribs: Place the pan with the ribs and cooking liquid over medium heat, uncovered. Cook until the liquid has reduced by three-quarters, about 1 hour. Continue to cook, spooning the sauce over the ribs, until the sauce is thick and ribs are glazed. Take care not to burn the glaze; move the ribs around in the pan to keep them from burning.
    Serve over mashed potatoes, egg noodles, or rice. LEGGI TUTTO

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    Chinese Hot and Sour Soup

    Craving Hot and Sour Soup just like your favorite Chinese restaurant? This recipe will hit the spot! It’s made with Chinese mushrooms, bamboo shoots, tofu, and a beaten egg.

    Hot and sour soup is a lot like chili; every family has their own recipe, and each family thinks that theirs is the best.
    When I was in the local Chinese market perusing the mushrooms I asked one of the other shoppers, a tiny and ancient woman half my height whose etched wrinkles framed a friendly smile, where the wood ear mushrooms were.
    “What are you using them for?”
    “Hot and sour soup,” I replied.
    “What? You don’t want those. Here,” she grabbed a bag of dried shiitake, “use these.”
    “No! You don’t want those for hot and sour soup!” cried another, more stout lady behind me. She said something in Cantonese to the first lady before grabbing a fresh bunch of enoki mushrooms and throwing them in my basket. “This is better.”

    Soon, nine women were having an all out argument in the middle of the aisle. I was stuck in the middle, caught between volleys of angry insults and defenses of cherished family recipes for hot and sour soup, both in Cantonese and English.
    People insulted each other’s families, critiqued the various provinces of China (all were in agreement that the people in the North, apparently, can’t cook good soup), and altered the contents of my shopping basket at whim.
    Eventually, a decision was reached that you absolutely have to use black fungus—an apt, but unappetizing name for a delightful ingredient—and lily buds. The other mushroom is up to you. Whatever one you decide on be sure to be ready to defend your choice.

    What Is Hot and Sour Soup?
    Hot and Sour Soup is a favorite Chinese menu item, and it has a long history in traditional Chinese cuisine. As you can tell by the story above, there are many “right” ways to make it!
    The predominant flavors in the soup are a spicy and sour, with earthy flavors from the mushrooms. The textures are also a contrast between silkiness from the tofu and egg and the crunchy, chewiness of the mushrooms.
    What are the Ingredients for Hot and Sour Soup?
    The hardest part about making hot and sour soup is really just collecting all the ingredients. Once you have those, you can have a bowl of restaurant-worthy soup on the table in under an hour!
    Here are some of the specialty ingredients you’ll need:
    Dried Chinese black fungus
    Dried wood ear, black, cloud, straw or shiitake mushrooms (or one bunch fresh enoki mushrooms)
    Lily buds
    Can of bamboo shoots
    Rice vinegar
    White pepper (do not substitute black pepper)
    Tofu
    You can sometimes find these ingredients at a well-stocked gourmet grocery store, but your best bet is to head to your closest Asian supermarket.
    BONUS: The mushrooms and lily buds will keep for quite some time in the pantry. You can have hot and sour soup whenever the craving hits!
    Vegetarian Hot and Sour Soup
    My version of hot and sour soup is made with chicken broth, but you can easily substitute vegetable broth for a vegetarian version.
    Storing and Freezing
    This soup is really best eaten as soon as its made and does not freeze well. If you have leftovers, reheat them gently on the stovetop over low heat.
    More Classic Chinese Recipes!
    Updated January 31, 2021 : We spiffed up this post to make it sparkle. No changes to the original recipe. LEGGI TUTTO

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    Homemade Pizza

    Classic homemade pizza recipe, including pizza dough and toppings, step-by-step instructions with photos. Make perfect pizza at home! Continue reading “Homemade Pizza” » LEGGI TUTTO

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    Chai

    Traditional chai tea recipe, prepared with full-bodied black tea, star anise, cloves, allspice, cinnamon, white peppercorns, cardamom, whole milk and sugar.

    Photography Credit: Elise Bauer

    The first time I had chai, I was in a small rented room in the Chungking Mansion in Hong Kong (notoriously cheap accommodations). Our little cel block area probably had 4 bedrooms, and one little old Chinese lady who sat in the entryway and managed them.
    The morning after my arrival I was still reeling from the shock of my expectations when I booked the place (“Chungking Mansion, my that sounds quite nice”) compared to the reality of the place, when the little old lady asked me, “Chai?”, pointing to a pot on the stove.

    “Sure,” I replied, not knowing exactly what was coming, perhaps tea?
    Boy was I surprised, and in the best possible way. Chai is tea, black tea, but tea steeped in milk, flavored with spices such as cinnamon, cardamom, and star anise, and sweetened with sugar or honey.
    This wonderful chai was the best discovery in Hong Kong; I couldn’t wait to spend another night in the Mansion, just to have some more chai in the morning. That was over 30 years ago and since then chai has become much more popular here.

    The other day my friend Suzanne served up some delicious chai and told me more of her experiences with it while in the Peace Corp in Africa. According to Suzanne, families have chai recipes the way they have curry recipes, every one a little different and each particular to a family.
    It can conveniently be made all in one pot, and you can use sweetened condensed milk from a can – important in the tropics. If you really want the authentic experience, drink it from a tin cup. Here is the way that Suzanne makes her chai:

    Chai Recipe

    Ingredients
    Spice ingredients for one pot of tea:
    1/2 of a star anise star
    10-12 whole cloves
    6-7 whole allspice
    1 heaping teaspoon of cinnamon bark (or 2 short sticks)
    6-7 whole white peppercorns
    1 cardamon pod opened to the seeds

    Other ingredients:
    1 cup water
    4 cups whole milk
    2 heaping tablespoons of a high quality full-bodied broad-leaf black tea (Ceylon, or English Breakfast if a broad-leaf Ceylon is not available)
    Sugar

    Method

    1 In a 2-qt saucepan, add spices to 1 cup of water. Bring to a boil; remove from heat; let steep for 5-20 minutes, depending on how strong a spice flavor you want.
    2 Add 4-6 cups of whole milk to the water and spices. If you don’t have whole milk, you can also use non-fat or low-fat milk, just add some cream to it, a few tablespoons. Bring the milk and spice mixture just to a boil and remove from heat.
    3 Add the tea to the milk and let steep for 5 to 10 minutes to taste. (Option at this point – reheat to a simmer and remove from heat.) You can add sugar at this point, or serve without sugar and let people put the amount of sugar in they want. Traditionally, sugar is added before serving.
    4 Strain into a pot. Serve. Add sugar to taste.

    Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. Thank you!

    This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Simply Recipes. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.

    Elise Bauer
    Elise Bauer is the founder of Simply Recipes. Elise launched Simply Recipes in 2003 as a way to keep track of her family’s recipes, and along the way grew it into one of the most popular cooking websites in the world. Elise is dedicated to helping home cooks be successful in the kitchen. Elise is a graduate of Stanford University, and lives in Sacramento, California.
    More from Elise LEGGI TUTTO

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    Non-Alcoholic Negroni (NAgroni)

    All the delight of a negroni cocktail, but without the alcohol! This non-alcoholic negroni relies on alcohol-free gin and vermouth to make a cocktail that’s just as bold and delicious as the original. Continue reading “Non-Alcoholic Negroni (NAgroni)” » LEGGI TUTTO

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    Air Fryer Cauliflower Buffalo Wings

    You’ll return bite after bite to this plate of Air Fryer Buffalo Cauliflower! The air fryer makes quick work of the cauliflower, turning it crispy on the outside and tender on the inside. Tossing it with buffalo sauce brings some massive flavor to the appetizer!

    Photography Credit: Nick Evans

    I’m generally a traditionalist when it comes to chicken wings. Give me the classic, please! But if you are serving a vegetarian crowd or just want something different (and slightly healthier), this Air Fryer Buffalo Cauliflower has all the spicy earthy flavors you crave to get your wing fix!
    This version is a riff on my normal air fryer crispy cauliflower. To get crispy on the outside, tender on the inside cauliflower add the sauce right at the end of cooking so it doesn’t burn and then just blast the florets in the air fryer for one final short cooking session.

    Why Make Buffalo Cauliflower in an Air Fryer?
    In short, it’s easier than a full on deep fryer and definitely healthier! I was amazed at how crispy and wonderful the finished florets get. It almost seems like a cheat code.
    The buffalo sauce I used is a really classic mix of hot sauce, butter, and spices. It tastes like game day to me and goes surprisingly well with cauliflower.

    No Air Fryer? Make Buffalo Cauliflower in your Oven!
    Baking this cauliflower is absolutely an option. It takes longer and the cauliflower, honestly, doesn’t get quite as crispy, but it’ll work and turn out great.
    I recommend lining a baking sheet with parchment paper for easier clean up and you’ll need to roast the cauliflower for at least 30 minutes at 400˚F, maybe as long as 45 minutes, to get a really crispy floret. Start checking the florets at the 30 minute mark. They are done when they are crispy on the outside, but you can easily pierce them with a fork.
    Buffalo Sauce Swaps and Substitutions
    There’s no reason you have to go with the standard for the hot sauce base. Try a more Tex-Mex style sauce by using something like Tapatio or go Thai with a Sriracha or Korean with gojuchang!

    Dips for the Buffalo Cauliflower
    Ranch dressing or blue cheese sauce is the standard here and I’m not sure I would mess with it too much. It’s a classic for a reason: it’s delicious!
    Can you make Buffalo Cauliflower in advance?
    You can absolutely prep the cauliflower and get it breaded and ready in advance and make the sauce in advance. The cooked cauliflower florets lose a lot of their pizazz though in the fridge so I would air-fry just the amount you can eat.
    Leftovers!
    If you do have leftovers, don’t toss them though! You can bring them back to life (as much as possible) either in the air fryer for a quick 2-3 minutes reheat session or in an oven for 5-6 minutes. I wouldn’t microwave the leftovers!

    More Great Air Fryer Recipes

    Air Fryer Cauliflower Buffalo Wings Recipe

    If you don’t have an air fryer, you can lay out the cauliflower on a baking sheet and roast it in your oven for 30 minutes, turning once halfway through. Then add a light coating of sauce to the cauliflower and roast for another 5 minutes. Then serve while warm with extra sauce.

    Ingredients
    1 large head cauliflower, broken into 1-inch florets
    2 eggs
    1 cup plain breadcrumbs
    Non-stick cooking spray
    1 cup Frank’s hot sauce
    1/4 cup butter, melted
    1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    Optional:

    Method

    1 Break apart the cauliflower: Cut the green stems back on the cauliflower head and then break or cut the head into about 1-inch florets. It’s easiest to start near the base of the cauliflower and work your way toward the center.
    2 Dip in egg wash and breadcrumbs: In a bowl large enough to hold the florets, whisk together 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of water. Add the florets to the egg mixture.
    Use a slotted spoon to stir the florets making sure each is well coated. Remove the florets from the egg mixture and add them to the breadcrumbs. Toss them around until they are well coated.

    3 Air fry the breaded cauliflower: Spray the air fryer basket with nonstick spray. Place the breaded florets in a single layer in the basket. Try not to crowd them. Set the air fryer to 350˚F and fry the cauliflower for 7 minutes. Flip each floret and fry for another 7 minutes. Transfer to a platter.
    Repeat this process until all the cauliflower have been fried.

    4 Make the buffalo sauce: In a small bowl, combine the hot sauce, melted butter, salt, garlic powder and black pepper.

    5 Coat the fried cauliflower: Dunk the florets of breaded and fried cauliflower one at time with a light coat of sauce. Return the pieces to the air fryer in a single layer and fry for another 4 minutes. Transfer to a platter.
    Repeat the frying process with all your florets.

    6 Serve: Serve the florets warm with blue cheese sauce, leftover buffalo sauce, and vegetables on the side.

    Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. Thank you!

    This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Simply Recipes. Read more about our affiliate linking policy.

    Nick Evans
    Nick has been writing delicious recipes for the home cook for almost a decade. He lives in Denver, CO and embraces a delicate balance of diaper changing, trail running and beer drinking. His website is Macheesmo and his first book is Love Your Leftovers.
    More from Nick LEGGI TUTTO

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    Quick Kimchi (Mak Gimchi)

    Kimchi is the name given to any number of fermented vegetables in Korea as a means to preserve the fall harvest for the cold winter months. This quick, small batch version is an easy way to learn how to make kimchi. It’s usually served as an accompaniment to other dishes providing spicy, salty, sour notes.

    It’s usually a combination of a main vegetable (like Napa cabbage or a radish), garlic, ginger, chile powder, salt, and a salted seafood or fish sauce. The most popular version is baechu kimchi, which is made from Napa cabbage, but there are nearly 200 “official” varieties in Korea!
    In this quick version, the cabbage is chopped into bite-sized pieces and mixed with the seasoning. The result is an easy kimchi with still a bit of bite, and all the salty, sour, spicy, and pungent flavors you’d expect from a vegetable pickled with fish sauce and garlic.

    My Personal Kimchi Story
    Growing up in Korea, kimchi-making was a communal affair, because each household would put up gallons of kimchi to feed their entire family for the winter.
    “Kimjang” was a neighborhood party where the ladies of the village would take turns helping each other with each household’s kimchi-making. Fall was a time for my sister and me to peel pounds and pounds of garlic for my mom’s annual kimchi.
    Lucky for us, we can make smaller batches now since we have refrigeration and don’t have to preserve an entire harvest before first snowfall.

    Why Kimchi Is Good for You
    The fermentation process of making kimchi produces probiotics, like the bacteria found in yogurt and sauerkraut.
    The probiotics promote not only good digestive health, but also support the immune system, heart health and have anti-inflammatory properties. The only downside of kimchi is its high salt content.
    Tips for Making Kimchi
    When making kimchi traditionally, I stuff individual leaves into a jar, but that takes a lot of time. For this version, I chop the cabbage into bite-sized pieces and mix the vegetables and seasonings together in one go.
    It’s not only easier to make, but also convenient to eat, because it’s already pre-cut and ready to serve.
    Choose vegetables that are dense and feel heavy for their size.
    Wear gloves when making kimchi, not only because the chili powder might burn and stain your hands, but also the garlic and fish sauce is pretty pungent.
    Use quart-sized canning jars with plastic lids. The salt corrodes the metal lids, and there’s no need for sealing the jars, which means the plastic lids work well here.
    Ways to Adapt this Kimchi Recipe
    Kimchi is easy to adapt to personal dietary and taste preferences.
    Make it vegetarian: Replace the fish sauce with an equal amount of sea salt and a tablespoon of kelp powder to add that extra depth of flavor.
    Adjust the heat: Add less chili powder or make white kimchi with no chili powder at all. That’s how the royals used to eat it, because spicy food was considered too common for royal palates!
    Chile Options: It’s best to use Korean chili powder if you can find it. If not, you can use cayenne pepper, chile de arbol, or red pepper flakes.

    How Do You Know When Kimchi is Ready?
    You can eat the kimchi freshly made—sort of like a salad, sprinkled with toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds. However, it’s best to let it ferment for at least a day or two before eating.
    How Long Will Quick Kimchi Keep?
    Store kimchi in the refrigerator for up to three weeks. It will get more sour and stronger in flavor, even getting a little effervescent, the longer it ferments.
    What to Serve with Kimchi
    Serve on the side of any Korean meal with rice and a variety of other banchan (side dishes). It’s also nice as a condiment to spice up any meat dishes or a salad that needs a kick.
    The longer Kimchi ferments, the more sour it will become. When it becomes too sour to eat on its own, you can use it as in ingredient to make kimchi mandu (dumplings), kimchi jjigae (stew), fried rice, kimchi buchingae (flatcakes), mixed noodles, or any number of kimchi dishes.

    More Easy Recipes for Preserving Vegetables LEGGI TUTTO